Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Cygwin BASH wrapper for Maven deploy:deploy-file

I frequently use Maven's deploy:deploy-file mojo for building project-local repositories.

Many interesting 3rd-party Java libraries are not (yet) available from public Maven repositories (the otherwise excellent dev.java.net projects are particularly weak in this respect), but I want to use them in my project POM. What to do?

I store them with my project. This is not an ideal solution, but it is practical.

To help me deploying jars, sources and javadocs I wrote a simple BASH wrapper script for Cygwin (to run under Linux/UNIX requires a trivial change). Here is typical use:

$ mvn-file-deploy ~/IdeaProjects/Scratch/lib cool-library-1.0.4.jar org.cool.library:cool-library:1.0.4
$ mvn-file-deploy -S ~/IdeaProjects/Scratch/lib cool-library-1.0.4-sources.jar org.cool.library:cool-library:1.0.4
$ mvn-file-deploy -J ~/IdeaProjects/Scratch/lib cool-library-1.0.4-javadocs.jar org.cool.library:cool-library:1.0.4

And the script itself:

#!/bin/bash

function help()
{
    cat <<'EOH' | fmt
Usage: mvn-file-deploy [options] REPO_PATH FILE_PATH DESCRIPTOR [CLASSIFIER]

Use mvn-file-deploy as a helper for 'mvn deploy:deploy-file' when using Cygwin.

EOH
    cat <<'EOH'
Options:
  -h, --help          Print this help message
      --version       Print program version
  -S, --sources       Deploy sources
  -J, --javadocs      Deploy javadocs
  -q, --quiet         Do not print maven command
EOH
    cat <<'EOH' | fmt

Other options are passed to Maven.  (BROKEN)

Examples:

The most common use is to run it like this:

    $ mvn-file-deploy C:/my/project/lib C:/some/interesting.jar groupId:artifactId:version

Or if you use a classifier (e.g., jdk5):

But sometimes like this.

    $ mvn-file-deploy C:/my/project/lib C:/some/interesting.jar groupId:artifactId:version classifier

Report bugs to <binkley@alumni.rice.edu>.
EOH
}

function version()
{
    cat <<'EOV' | fmt
mvn-file-deploy 1.0
Copyright (C) 2007 JPMorganChase, Inc.  All rights reserved.
EOV
}

function fatal()
{
    echo "$0: $*" >&2
    exit 2
}

function usage() 
{
    cat <<'EOU' | fmt >&2
usage: mvn-file-deploy [options] REPO_PATH FILE_PATH DESCRIPTOR [CLASSIFIER]
EOU
}

eval set -- "$(getopt -o hJSq --long help,javadocs,sources,quiet,version -n "$0" -- "$@")"

declare -a maven_opts
declare -a args

for opt
do
    shift
    case "$opt" in
        -h|--help ) help ; exit 0 ;;
        -J|--javadocs ) classifier=-Dclassifier=javadocs ;;
        -S|--sources ) classifier=-Dclassifier=sources ;;
        --version ) version ; exit 0 ;;
        -q|--quiet ) quiet=t ; maven_opts=("${maven_opts[@]}" "$opt") ;;
        -- ) break ;;
        -* ) maven_opts=("${maven_opts[@]}" "$opt") ;;
    esac
done

case $# in
    3 ) repo_path="$1"
        file_path="$2"
        descriptor="$3" ;;
    4 ) repo_path="$1"
        file_path="$2"
        descriptor="$3"
        classifier=-Dclassifier="$4" ;;
    * ) usage ; exit 2 ;;
esac

(cd "$repo_path" 2>/dev/null) || \
    fatal "No such repository path: $repo_path"

repo_url="file://$(cygpath -am "$repo_path")"
file_path="$(cygpath -am "$file_path")"

[[ -r "$file_path" ]] || \
    fatal "No such artifact: $file_path"

triplet=($(echo $descriptor | tr : ' '))

(( 3 == ${#triplet[*]} )) || \
    fatal "Descriptor not groupId:artifactId:version format: $descriptor"

packaging=-Dpackaging="${file_path##*.}"

[[ -n "$quiet" ]] ||
    echo mvn "${maven_opts[@]}" deploy:deploy-file -Durl="$repo_url" \
        -DrepositoryId=project -Dfile="$file_path" -DgroupId=${triplet[0]} \
        -DartifactId=${triplet[1]} -Dversion=${triplet[2]} \
        $packaging $classifier
exec mvn "${maven_opts[@]}" deploy:deploy-file -Durl="$repo_url" \
    -DrepositoryId=project -Dfile="$file_path" -DgroupId=${triplet[0]} \
    -DartifactId=${triplet[1]} -Dversion=${triplet[2]} \
    $packaging $classifier

Sunday, August 19, 2007

Recursive "toString"

Sometimes for debugging I want to dump an object recursively. That is, I'd like to see not just an Apache Commons Lang-style toString, but a recursive version which descends fields to display their inner bits as well.

Rather than complain, I coded my own. Enjoy!

public static String recursiveToString(final Object o) {
    final StringBuilder buffer = new StringBuilder();

    recursiveToString(new StringBuilder(), o, buffer,
            new HashSet<Object>());

    return buffer.toString();
}

private static void recursiveToString(final StringBuilder prefix,
        final Object o, final StringBuilder buffer,
        final Set<Object> seen) {
    if (null == o) {
        buffer.append("null\n");
        return;
    }

    // Mark back references with angle brackets
    if (seen.contains(o)) {
        buffer.append('<');
        objectToString(o, buffer);
        buffer.append(">\n");
        return;
    }

    seen.add(o);

    objectToString(o, buffer);

    // TODO: More clever to see if protection domain is in the JDK
    if (shouldNotRecurse(o, o.getClass().getPackage().getName())) {
        buffer.append('=');
        buffer.append(o);
        buffer.append('\n');
        return;
    }

    buffer.append("={");
    buffer.append('\n');

    final StringBuilder fieldPrefix = new StringBuilder(prefix);
    fieldPrefix.append("  ");

    for (final Field field : o.getClass().getDeclaredFields()) {
        field.setAccessible(true);
        buffer.append(fieldPrefix);
        buffer.append(field.getName());
        buffer.append('(');
        buffer.append(Modifier.toString(field.getModifiers()));
        buffer.append(")=");

        try {
            recursiveToString(fieldPrefix, field.get(o), buffer, seen);
        } catch (final IllegalAccessException e) {
            buffer.append("? (");
            buffer.append(e.getMessage());
            buffer.append(')');
        }
    }

    buffer.append(prefix);
    buffer.append("}\n");
}

private static boolean shouldNotRecurse(final Object o,
        final String packageName) {
    try {
        return (packageName.startsWith("java.") || packageName
                .startsWith("javax.")) && !Object.class
                .getMethod("toString")
                .equals(o.getClass().getMethod("toString"));
    } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
}

private static void objectToString(final Object o,
        final StringBuilder buffer) {
    buffer.append(o.getClass().getName());
    buffer.append('@');
    buffer.append(Integer.toHexString(System.identityHashCode(o)));
}

LuboŇ° Motl answers some physics questions

Wow! I miss physics sometimes.